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Technical [clear filter]
Wednesday, November 12
 

11:00

Transformation Priority Premise Deep Dive
I have been practicing test driven development (TDD) over four years. I believe Baby Step is one of most difficult parts by learning TDD. "How should I choose the next test to drive my code in the easiest and smallest way?" is a very common question raised by TDD newbies. Unlike refactoring, there is no clear describable methodology in this area. Near the end of year 2010, Uncle Bob created a concept called Transformation Priority Premise (TPP) which throw a light into this area.
In this talk, I will share my thoughts and experiences of applying TPP in TDD. Here are key points of this talk.
How can TPP help to do baby step in TDD TPP Deep Dive
A wrong order in current TPP list? I will explain it with my experience report by applying TPP in one of my recent Kata https://github.com/JosephYao/KataNumbersInWord
TPP and Problem splitting in TDD. I will talk about how I see TPP working together with the problem splitting skill we apply in TDD, which is a key value of TDD as design methodology.
How is TPP related to refactoring? I will explain how to identify the real transformation given that doing transformation and refactoring in one TDD cycle.
Based on my experience, there could be main transformation and sub transformation when applying TPP
As a learning outcome of this talk, I hope audiences can see TPP as a way to learn baby step in TDD and get some ideas about how to apply TPP more clearly and intensively when doing TDD.

Speakers
avatar for Joseph Yao

Joseph Yao

Agile Coach, Odd-e
Joseph is an Odd-e Agile Coach and provides agile practice coaching and training for teams. He has more than 13 years’ development and project management experience in software industry, as well as, a broad knowledge in both internet (web & app) and desktop software development... Read More →



Wednesday November 12, 2014 11:00 - 12:00
Room 2

15:30

You Can’t be Great without Technical Excellence
Technical excellence is more than two week sprints, a burn-down chart and a daily stand-up meeting. The basic rules of Agile or Scrum are not an end in themselves, but rather a staring point based upon principles and practices that allow and encourage teams to adopt, adapt, and refine their craft. Unfortunately, it may seem to the technical people that agile is just another micro-management approach.
Extreme Programming with its provocative name, got people’s attention in 1999. It is based on sound technical practices. Why do so few agile teams employ engineering practices that support the tight iterative cycles of Agile and Scrum? The founders of Scrum expected the continuous improvement cycle to pull engineering practices into teams once the cycle revealed the problems of poor product quality, hard to change code, wasted time debugging, long stabilization efforts and the ever growing burden of manual test.
In this talk we’ll look at why the technical practices of test-driven development, refactoring, continuous design, clean code and automated testing can help you and your organization be great.

Speakers
avatar for James Grenning

James Grenning

Founder, Wingman Software
James Grenning, founder of Wingman Software, trains, coaches and consults worldwide. With more than thirty years of software development experience, both technical and managerial, James brings a wealth of knowledge, skill, and creativity to software development teams and their management... Read More →



Wednesday November 12, 2014 15:30 - 16:30
Keynote

17:00

Worse Is Better, for Better or for Worse
Nearly two-and-a-half decades ago, Richard Gabriel proposed the idea of “Worse Is Better” to explain why some things that are designed to be pure and perfect are eclipsed by solutions that are seemingly compromised and imperfect. This is not simply the observation that things should be better but are not, or that flawed and ill-considered solutions are superior to those created with intention, but that many solutions that are narrow and incomplete work out better than the solutions conceived of as being comprehensive and all encompassing. Whether it is programming languages, operating systems, development processes or development practices, we find many examples of this in software development, some more provocative and surprising than others.
In this talk we revisit the original premise and definition, and look at how this approach to development can still teach us something surprising and new.

Speakers
avatar for Kevlin Henney

Kevlin Henney

consultant · father · husband · itinerant · programmer · speaker · trainer · writer
Kevlin Henney is an independent consultant, trainer and writer based in the UK. His development interests are in patterns, programming, practice and process. He has been a columnist for many magazines and web sites and is co-author of A Pattern Language for Distributed Computing and... Read More →



Wednesday November 12, 2014 17:00 - 18:00
Keynote
 
Thursday, November 13
 

11:00

Test Driven Development: That's not what we meant
Test-Driven Development (TDD) has been so successful that it's now unfashionable. But many developers complain that being required to write tests just gets in the way of shipping features. That wasn't our experience when we first stumbled onto TDD a dozen years ago, so what went wrong? Were we fooling ourselves, or did the message get confused along the way?

In this talk, I will revisit the basics, the essence of what makes TDD work. I will look at some of the common difficulties that I see with teams that are struggling. I will show how understanding the principles means that we can use tests to help us deliver more effectively.

Speakers
avatar for Steve Freeman

Steve Freeman

Software developer, coach, and trainer
Steve Freeman, author of Growing Object Oriented Software, Guided by Tests (Addison-Wesley), was a pioneer of Agile software development in the UK. Steve is a technical principle with Springer Verlag in London. He has developed software for a range of institutions, from small vendors... Read More →



Thursday November 13, 2014 11:00 - 12:00
Room 1

15:30

Programming with GUTs
These days testing is considered sexy for programmers. Who'd have thought it? But there is a lot more to effective programmer testing than the fashionable donning of a unit-testing framework: writing Good Unit Tests (GUTs) involves (a lot) more than knowledge of assertion syntax.

Testing represents a form of communication and, as such, it offers multiple levels and forms of feedback, not just basic defect detection. Effective unit testing requires an understanding of what forms of feedback and communication are offered by tests, and what styles encourage or discourage such qualities.

What style of test partitioning is most common, and yet scales poorly and is ineffective at properly expressing the behaviour of a class or component? What styles, tricks and tips can be used to make tests more specification-like and scalable to large codebaes?

Speakers
avatar for Kevlin Henney

Kevlin Henney

consultant · father · husband · itinerant · programmer · speaker · trainer · writer
Kevlin Henney is an independent consultant, trainer and writer based in the UK. His development interests are in patterns, programming, practice and process. He has been a columnist for many magazines and web sites and is co-author of A Pattern Language for Distributed Computing and... Read More →



Thursday November 13, 2014 15:30 - 16:30
Keynote
 
Friday, November 14
 

11:00

Constructive Action in the Face Of Technical Debt
When we plan and manage projects, we are seldom given a blank page. We have staffing and scheduling concerns, and a variety of other issues to contend with, but below each of them is the one thing that affects completion and effort more than anything else: the quality of the existing code.
In this talk, Michael Feathers will outline managerial and team strategies for moving projects forward in the context of code that is hard to change. We'll talk about how to manage risk, how to create new opportunities moving forward, and how to work in ways which avoid to creation of further problems in large existing code bases.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Feathers

Michael Feathers

Director, R7K LLC
Michael Feathers is the founder and Director of R7K Research & Conveyance, a company specializing in software and organization design. Prior to forming R7K, Michael was the Chief Scientist of Obtiva and a consultant with Object Mentor International. Over the years, Michael has spent... Read More →


Friday November 14, 2014 11:00 - 12:00
Keynote

13:30

Building on SOLID foundations
Why can’t we just add a feature to our system without tearing the code apart or, worse, patching around it? It ought to take just a few lines. We know the code is supposed to be modular and coherent, but too often it just doesn’t turn out that way.

We don’t believe it should be this hard to change object-oriented systems. We’ve seen examples where it really is that easy to add a new feature. The difference seems to be in the intermediate level structure. The design principles that most programmers rely on don’t address the middle ground where the complexity lies. We know about principles and patterns at the small scale, such as SOLID, and the large scale, such as REST. We’re less familiar with the structures in the middle.

This talk is about design principles that we’ve learned help us develop mid-scale code structures that are easy to read and easy to change. At the lowest level, this means well-known patterns such as avoiding globals and following SOLID guidelines. At larger scales, this means assembling those SOLID objects to avoid hidden coupling so that the system as a whole is amenable to change. We focus on how objects fit together and communicate, and on being clear about how capabilities and information flow between objects in the running system.

Speakers
avatar for Steve Freeman

Steve Freeman

Software developer, coach, and trainer
Steve Freeman, author of Growing Object Oriented Software, Guided by Tests (Addison-Wesley), was a pioneer of Agile software development in the UK. Steve is a technical principle with Springer Verlag in London. He has developed software for a range of institutions, from small vendors... Read More →



Friday November 14, 2014 13:30 - 14:30
Room 1

15:00

How to replace large 24/7 systems and keep delivering value
The main message is continuous delivery of real value while dealing with complex technical challenges. In other words, don't say 'no’ to business because systems are old or a "big ball of mud". A problem many large enterprise organisations have today begins with a promise of business value over few year. But first thing an IT department “needs" to do is implementation of some technical fundament or legacy replacement, while business is waiting.

This is a story about gradual replacement (StranglerApplication) of large, business-critical, 24/7 systems with very high quality requirements, used Agile practices in dealing with architecture, migration, and enterprise aspects. It is about new way in dealing with complex architectural questions (compared to traditional architecture processes) where everyone is involved, emergent design, and simplicity.

It is also a real-life story about 4 cross-functional Scrum / DevOps / feature teams working together and with many stakeholders for 4 years, delivering value with new version in production, every 2 weeks. The talk is an example of false dichotomies that agile and architecture need to compromise, or "without QA people you will have a big mess in such projects".
The story can also be read in this paper. It is currently being edited for posting on InfoQ.

Speakers
avatar for Viktor Grgic

Viktor Grgic

Lean / Agile IT / Software Architect
Viktor is an Agile / Scrum Coach and software craftsman, with over 15 years of experience in leading and coaching (distributed) teams, management, and building software. Viktor has designed and developed software solutions for transport, government, banking and retail industries... Read More →



Friday November 14, 2014 15:00 - 16:00
Room 1